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Cartoid and Peripheral Arterial Disease

Carotid Artery Disease

The main stay of treatment of the blocked arteries providing blood to the brain (carotid artery disease) is medical therapy. In certain cases where a patient has had a stroke or mini stroke AND have severe blockage in the carotid arteries, the treatment consists of surgery or stent placement. 
 
Using similar techniques as those used to place stents in the blood vessels of the heart, balloon angioplasty and stenting can be done in the carotid arteries. This allows patients to go home within a day or two after the procedure. 
 
An alternative to stent placement is surgery where the blockage is removed and the artery is repaired. This typically requires a longer stay in the hospital. 

Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD)

Stable PAD is typically treated with smoking cessation (if the patient smokes), medications and an exercise program under the guidance of a qualified healthcare provider. The medications are used to control risk factors for developing PAD such as high blood pressure, diabetes and elevated cholesterol. 
 
In certain cases where medical therapy fails, surgery or balloon angioplasty and stent placement are needed. This is usually reserved for patients with pain in the legs at rest or life style limiting claudication (pain in the legs with exercise) and non-healing ulcers or wounds.
 
Using similar techniques as those used to place stents in the blood vessels of the heart, balloon angioplasty and stenting can be done in the legs. This allows patients to go home within a day or two after the procedure. 
 
Surgery is more complicated and consists of using artificial grafts or the patient's own veins which are used to bypass the blockages.


To learn more about the services provided by Westchester Heart and Vascular please contact us at:

866-WMC-HEART (866.962.4327).